About
a college student, a writer, a poet, a poly kinky LGBTQ* atheist trying to figure shit out.

Fan of: Doctor Who, Sherlock, Lord of the Rings, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, The Hunger Games, Tamora Pierce, and many, many more.

Currently Obsessing Over
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I'm currently on hiatus from all RPing, but the Terre d'Ange Roleplay Boards are super rad! Send me asks for more information, or just come and join them!

See below for my tumblr RP blogs.
b> I'm a GENDER scout!

 

datzhott:

Plus-Sized Woman Rocks Bikini on Hollywood Boulevard to Promote Body Acceptance
Los Angeles is known for many things: great weather, a laidback lifestyle, and Hollywood’s biggest stars. But for many who live in La La Land, the pressure to conform to a certain beauty standard can leave them feeling downright depressed.

Yesssss fuckin perfect.

datzhott:

Plus-Sized Woman Rocks Bikini on Hollywood Boulevard to Promote Body Acceptance

Los Angeles is known for many things: great weather, a laidback lifestyle, and Hollywood’s biggest stars. But for many who live in La La Land, the pressure to conform to a certain beauty standard can leave them feeling downright depressed.

Yesssss fuckin perfect.

A Black man holding a wallet is more likely to be shot by the police than a White man holding a gun.

In 2002, a study by Joshua Correll and colleagues, called The Police Officer’s Dilemma, revealed a phenomenon also known as shooter-bias 

The study found that people hesitated longer to shoot an armed white target (and they were more likely to accidentally not shoot). Participants were quicker and more accurate with black armed targets but there were more “false alarms” (shooting them when they were unarmed). These effects were present even though participants did not hold any explicit discriminatory views and wanted to treat all targets fairly

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(via odinsblog)

Why I Love Epic Fantasy (And Hate Game of Thrones)

One of the best explanations of what exactly it is that Game of Thrones is doing to us, to all of us. And a question—how can we harness that vulnerability?

interndana:

[also content warning for discussion of ableism on the show and in fandom]

OK, let’s talk about Sally Donovan.  Everybody has an opinion about her, and it doesn’t seem there’s much in-between.  Either you love her or (more likely if you’re in the BBC Sherlock fandom) you think she’s a “cunt”, a “bitch”, or “hateful” and “jealous of Sherlock”.

The particular scene I chose to .gif has been a subject of a lot of fandom discussion.  I made a post about it awhile ago that got circulated a bit and stirred up a lot of fandom discussion about Sally Donovan and her treatment by the show and by fans.  Still, what most fans seem to take from this scene are two pieces of information:

  1. Sally calls Sherlock “freak.”
  2. Sherlock insinuates that Sally and Anderson slept together

Some select quotes from the “Sally Donovan” tag on tumblr and from discussions on posts in that tag, just to give you a taste of how fandom interprets these facts:

"Every time she says something derogatory toward Sherlock or calls him a freak, I want to punch her"

"Repeatedly calling him a freak even when Sherlock hasn’t said a word to her, is hardly called for. Reacting to his deductions, that I get, but calling him a freak all of the time?"

"Can we at least talk about how inappropriate SHE was? She doesn’t like Sherlock, fine. But she’s on duty at the scene of a murder where Sherlock was obviously called in to help and the first thing she does is call him a freak. "

Okay, we get it, she calls him a freak.  Obviously this is rude, ableist behavior and it’s not very nice or professional.  We have established that Sally called him a bad name, and I will come back to it later.  But we can and should look at this scene more closely and extrapolate a little more from it than that.

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YES YES YES. All of this. I am *sick* of the Donovan hate when ALL the awful ableist, sexist, racist shit that Sherlock pulls gets a free pass OVER and OVER again.

sinidentidades:

Black Mothers Speak Out After Trayvon: ‘My Son Is Not a Suspect’

In the aftermath of George Zimmerman’s acquittal on all charges related to the shooting death of Trayvon Martin, the continued racial profiling of young black men has become even bigger news than usual. On Tuesday, Essence Magazine launched a social media campaign called #HeIsNotASuspect to challenge the negative images of young black men in the media. Its aim is to end racial profiling by targeting the often unacknowledged victims of violence targeted at young black men: the black mothers, grandmothers, aunties, sisters, and girlfriends who are often left behind to pick up the pieces.

So far, the campaign has unearthed beautiful images and declarations of love. Check them out after the jump.

The Challenge

atriptothemorg:

The queer radical community is one that I have long identified with. Ever since I came out as queer, and later as trans*, it has been this community that I have been consistently drawn to. Regardless of what city I’m living in, I always seem to find the radical queers. I have organized with and marched along side with radical queers. From facilitating a workshop on queer activism to marching at Queer Bomb (in Austin) or the Dyke March (in Boston) to staffing a drop-in center for queer youth, I have done a lot of work with the queer community and I hope to continue. Not only because I am queer but also because these are my people and I want to work with them.

Which is why it’s so frustrating, not to mention problematic, when I’m the only trans woman of color in radical queer space. Over and over again, I find myself in a room full of cis queer women and trans men. Over and over again, I find myself in a room full of white people. The radical queer community positions itself as representative of all queer people and advocates for the needs of the queer community. It supposedly fights against those systems of power and oppression that keep all queers oppressed. And yet at the same time, trans women of color are nowhere to be seen; even though they are the most vulnerable in our community.

One has only to glance at the case of CeCe Mcdonald to see all the worst intersections and manifestation of white supremacy, patriarchy and capitalism. She was arrested and is being charged with second-degree murder, the same charge as George Zimmerman, for being the victim of a hate crime and fighting back. She is being charged, basically, for being a poor, black, trans woman. And while there has been a very strong movement of people organizing to free her, this is the exception to the rule.

The last 20 reported cases of trans* murders have all been trans women of color. What, than, does this say about the radical queer community when we are not centering the needs of the most vulnerable in our organizing? How can we purport to create a fully equitable world if we are not making space for them?

The reason for all this is that transmisogyny and racism is rampant and often unchecked in radical queer spaces. From TWoC lack of presence to their lack of “desirability” to their outright exclusion, it’s clear that the radical queer community is not accountable to us. They assume that since white cis queers are oppressed, they couldn’t possibly be oppressive themselves. Somehow, they think that people’s queerness excuses or erases the other ways in which they are privileged. But this is a myth that needs to be constantly challenged. The radical queer community needs to be aware in the ways that they are being oppressive, especially when it is unintentional. They need to know that there are reasons why trans women of color don’t show up to their functions or their rallies. And its because you don’t represent us.

How many black and brown trans women need to die before you put our needs first? In April alone, there have been 3 reported murders. 3 women killed in a community that is already small and nearly invisible. Coko Williams, Clay Paige, Brandy Martell. And if these are the reported murders, can you imagine the number of unreported murders? The unclaimed bodies and forgotten names?

So I challenge you, dear radical, to put your money where your mouth is. If you are really committed to this work, put us first. Be aware of our struggles, of our triumphs. Hell, be aware of our existence! Don’t just mourn us when we are murdered, but celebrate and work with us in life. Actively participate in making this world a safer place for us.

But most of all, I challenge you to see us. To know us.

(Source: labrujamorgan)

queermuseum:

Queer African American Women and the History of Marriage 
This photo and headline accompanied an article from the October 15, 1970 issue of Jet magazine. They reveal that long before the recent struggle for marriage equality began,  African American women who love women have engaged with the institution of marriage and have fought to make it their own.
Edna Knowles, on the left, and Peaches Stevens were wed in Liz’s Mark III Lounge, a gay bar on the South Side of Chicago, “before a host of friends and well wishers.” The article ended by noting, “although the duo has a type of ‘marriage license’ in their possession, the state’s official marriage license bureau reported it had no record of their license.” This ending serves to remind Jet readers that Knowles and Stevens’ union was not legitimate in the eyes of the state, as does the use of quotes around the word “married” in the headline.
However, decades prior to this bold public display of queer affection, African American female couples in New York strategized alternative ways to obtain marriage licenses in the 1920s and 30s:
“Marriage ceremonies were held with large wedding parties which included several bridesmaids, attendants, and other wedding party members. Actual marriage licenses were obtained by either masculinizing the first name, or having a gay male surrogate obtain the license for the marrying couple. These marriage licenses were placed on file with the New York City Marriage Bureau.” - Luvenia Pinson, “The Black Lesbian: Times Past-Time Present,” Womanews, May 1980  p. 8.
Also during the 1930s, popular performer Gladys Bentley was making a living singing bawdy tunes and playing piano late into the night at various clubs all over New York, including one named after her.

Bentley married her white girlfriend in Atlantic City in a ceremony to which she invited friends in the entertainment industry:
“Columnist Louis Sobol remembered Bentley coming over to his table one night and whispering, ‘I’m getting married tomorrow and you’re invited.’ When Sobol asked who the lucky man was to be, she giggled and replied, ‘Man? Why boy you’re crazy. I’m marryin’ ——’ and she named another woman singer.” - Eric Garber, “Gladys Bentley: The Bulldagger Who Sang the Blues,” Out/Look, Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 52-61.
These examples show some of the various ways queer African American women have created public rituals to express their relationships and have therefore insisted on their rights to full citizenship, many decades prior to the current struggle for marriage equality. 


- Cookie
 

queermuseum:

Queer African American Women and the History of Marriage 

This photo and headline accompanied an article from the October 15, 1970 issue of Jet magazine. They reveal that long before the recent struggle for marriage equality began,  African American women who love women have engaged with the institution of marriage and have fought to make it their own.

Edna Knowles, on the left, and Peaches Stevens were wed in Liz’s Mark III Lounge, a gay bar on the South Side of Chicago, “before a host of friends and well wishers.” The article ended by noting, “although the duo has a type of ‘marriage license’ in their possession, the state’s official marriage license bureau reported it had no record of their license.” This ending serves to remind Jet readers that Knowles and Stevens’ union was not legitimate in the eyes of the state, as does the use of quotes around the word “married” in the headline.

However, decades prior to this bold public display of queer affection, African American female couples in New York strategized alternative ways to obtain marriage licenses in the 1920s and 30s:

“Marriage ceremonies were held with large wedding parties which included several bridesmaids, attendants, and other wedding party members. Actual marriage licenses were obtained by either masculinizing the first name, or having a gay male surrogate obtain the license for the marrying couple. These marriage licenses were placed on file with the New York City Marriage Bureau.” - Luvenia Pinson, “The Black Lesbian: Times Past-Time Present,” Womanews, May 1980  p. 8.

Also during the 1930s, popular performer Gladys Bentley was making a living singing bawdy tunes and playing piano late into the night at various clubs all over New York, including one named after her.

Gladys Bentley

Bentley married her white girlfriend in Atlantic City in a ceremony to which she invited friends in the entertainment industry:

“Columnist Louis Sobol remembered Bentley coming over to his table one night and whispering, ‘I’m getting married tomorrow and you’re invited.’ When Sobol asked who the lucky man was to be, she giggled and replied, ‘Man? Why boy you’re crazy. I’m marryin’ ——’ and she named another woman singer.” - Eric Garber, “Gladys Bentley: The Bulldagger Who Sang the Blues,” Out/Look, Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 52-61.

These examples show some of the various ways queer African American women have created public rituals to express their relationships and have therefore insisted on their rights to full citizenship, many decades prior to the current struggle for marriage equality. 
- Cookie

 

“It is a pity the young Pi was not nominated There’s not much you can do. He’s an Indian actor and nobody knows him so he was easily overlooked.

With peer voting, people will vote for their friends or based on their impressions. He’s a newcomer and we often said he had never acted before—that’s a disadvantage to getting nominated. But I do think his performance was the purest performance.”

Taiwanese director Ang Lee noting Hollywood’s tendency to overlook Asian actors to a Chinese radio station.   Ang Lee was disappointed that Suraj Sharma was not nominated for Best Actor for his performance in The Life of Pi.  Lee added that he felt Irfan Khan should have been nominated for Best Supporting Actor, and that Zhang Ziyi was not nominated either for Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, nor were any actors nominated for Slumdog Millionaire.

What’s a guy gotta do to get an Oscar?  Here’s some trivia about Sharma’s work on the film, from FirstPost.com.

  • Sharma beat out 4,000 other applicants (Ang Lee decided from the start the role would not be whitewashed.)
  • Sharma had never acted prior to this so Ang Lee assigned him a pile of homework and made him act scenes from Teneesse Williams and other playwrights just for practice.
  • Sharma didn’t know how to swim when he was cast for the role.  When he first started out he could only hold his breath for 14 seconds.  In the end he was able to go for one minute and a half.
  • Sharma spent most of the movie filming in a pool emoting in front of a blue screen to an invisible tiger.
  • Sharma lost 20% of his body weight for the role, eating a diet that mostly consisted of tuna fish, just like his character, so his ribs would show.
  • Sharma cut himself up frequently while working on the boat and used those injuries in his acting.  He would allow himself to get flipped along with the boat.
  • The production was banned from speaking the Sharma.  Ang Lee and Sharma agreed that he would not to talk to other people for almost two months so he would understand what isolation was like.

1.   This kid is badass.

2.  When white actors like Christian Bale and Leonardo DiCaprio do stuff like lose 20% of their body weight or cut themselves and keep acting everyone cheers uproariously.

3. It is weirdly dismissive when films about characters of color get nominated but their actors do not.  Django Unchained, Life of Pi, Slumdog Millionaire, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, The Last Emperor, etc.

4.   As FirstPost points out, a lot of the Oscar snubbed actors that people are talking about like Leonardo DiCaprio have plenty of other opportunities to star in other big movies.   When is the next big project for an actor of South Asian descent coming up?

(via racebending)

(Source: m1905.com)

sicosa:

It was my friend’s mom’s birthday yesterday. Both our moms are single parents and I started thinking about how strong they had to be for us. Then I started thinking about women of color in general. Being a PoC ain’t a walk in the park by itself, but add being a woman in a patriarchal society? Nahhh. I can’t imagine how hard it must be for women of color. AND THEN people have the nerve to call em out on being hard and growing a thick skin, telling them to smile and be happy n’ shit. Fuck outta here. Women that face all that bull and STILL manage to come out on top amaze me. 
These thoughts inspired this piece. A black Wonder Woman. 

sicosa:

It was my friend’s mom’s birthday yesterday. Both our moms are single parents and I started thinking about how strong they had to be for us. Then I started thinking about women of color in general. Being a PoC ain’t a walk in the park by itself, but add being a woman in a patriarchal society? Nahhh. I can’t imagine how hard it must be for women of color. AND THEN people have the nerve to call em out on being hard and growing a thick skin, telling them to smile and be happy n’ shit. Fuck outta here. Women that face all that bull and STILL manage to come out on top amaze me. 

These thoughts inspired this piece. A black Wonder Woman. 

Why I almost defriended everyone who had an HRC logo as their profile photo this week

agnesgalore:

It’s becoming increasingly clear to me that, though I didn’t think about this at the time, I probably started a blog because I need somewhere to vent my boundless rage that is not random people’s Facebook walls. I mean, one thing among the many thousands of things that are guaranteed to raise my blood pressure is when folks get all “the internet isn’t real, and it’s not a viable platform for communication,” but also like, Facebook fights are dumb, I’m supposed to be an adult now.

So here’s the thing that got me all het up this week: gay marriage.

 

Specifically, these goddamn things: 

image

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this is fantastic. please read this.

We Want You!

rudegirlmag:

Are you a WOC ages 18-25?

Do you get frustrated from being left out of mainstream publications?

Would you like a place were you can fully embrace being you and your culture?

Then Rude Girl Mag wants you. 

Rude Girl Mag is an online women’s magazine created by Bre Moore. Frustrated by constantly not seeing herself represented in mainstream publications she decided to create a space for her fellow women of color. 

Rude Girl Mag is targeted towards women of color ages 18-25. It is a place were we can come together and celebrate ourselves. Our goal is for all women that identify as a WOC to find a place here. 

We’re hoping to launch on January 1st and we’re currently we’re looking for editors, writers and artists. 

So if you fit our demographic and are interested in getting involved please contact Bre at rudegirlmag@gmail.com

heavenscalyx replied to your post: heavenscalyx started following you Hi! Yes, let…

You are incredibly kind! Let us be friends in all social media! I’ve just been thinking about using this thing to do Wonder City stuuuuffff…

Ooh, that is a good idea, too.

TO ALL MY FOLLOWERS:

GUYS. THIS IS HEAVENSCALYX WHO DOES AMAZING STUFF OVER AT WONDER CITY STORIES.

I’ve blogged about Wonder City Stories before but I’m gonna do it again because I cannot recommend it enough.

From the Wonder city intro page:

Wonder City Stories is an ongoing serial that explores gender, race, and sexuality in a richly-populated superhero comic book universe, actively deconstructing the persistent themes of the genre through the eyes of a group of compelling characters who are unusual in that context: women, elderly people, POCs, LGBTQI people, and more.

It’s a universe where the equivalent of Superman is a short, round, middle-aged black woman, and its version of Captain America is a homeless, elderly veteran living out of her van. Where superpowers don’t guarantee special treatment, money, or success, and where time continues to flow forward so that most people age and have to live with consequences, with no reboots or retcons.

Wonder City Stories is a cyberfunded creativity project. Cyberfunded creativity allows writers and other artistic creators to sell their goods directly to audiences online, and further allows people to support creators they admire, which encourages those creators to produce more of what their audience members enjoy.

There are some truly amazing stories on there, so go check them out!

Wonder City Stories is on its third volume right now. There are two full volumes and numerous interludes which help to flesh out the world. GO. READ IT NOW. ALL OF YOU.