About
a college student, a writer, a poet, a poly kinky LGBTQ* atheist trying to figure shit out.

Fan of: Doctor Who, Sherlock, Lord of the Rings, Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett, The Hunger Games, Tamora Pierce, and many, many more.

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I'm currently on hiatus from all RPing, but the Terre d'Ange Roleplay Boards are super rad! Send me asks for more information, or just come and join them!

See below for my tumblr RP blogs.
b> I'm a GENDER scout!

 

Natasha’s Justice Project: Recap (TW: rape, sexual assault, prison system, criminal justice in the US)

This was a post I wrote for the class blog of my Feminism: Literature & Cultural Contexts course at Stony Brook. I was asked to share it more widely by a classmate, so it’s going on my tumblr.

——-

I am too sick right now to go to class, but not too sick to be on the computer, so I thought I’d do a report back from the event the Feminist Majority Leadership Alliance put on, inviting Natasha Alexenko, the founder and spokesperson of the Natasha’s Justice Project, to speak about her own experiences and the wider issues of the rape kit backlog.

Since April, aside from being National Poetry Month, is also Sexual Assault Awareness Month and, since #WhyIDidntReport, a discussion of the many reasons why survivors of sexual assault do not report their assaults to the authorities, started on twitter yesterday (and is still going strong), I thought this would be timely.

To start, I will recap the event itself and the information I learned from it. At the end of the post, I will discuss my personal conclusions. It goes without saying that this whole post is under a massive trigger warning, although I will avoid describing any assaults or rapes in detail (body of post under Read More tag).

Read More

clubjacobin:

tipsforradicals:

The more democratic a group or campaign is, the more effective it is, as all people involved can have an input and feel a part of the project.
Although often basic, this information is essential for the smooth-running of an organisation and sticking to these simple guidelines can make the difference between a long lasting successful group and a failure.
Below find tips on many aspects of organising, from facilitating meetings and financing your group, to structure and making decisions.
How to start a group
Basic principles of revolutionary organisation
Coming up with a strategy and set of principles
Decision making and organisational form
Financing a group
Handling difficult behaviour in meetings
How to organise and facilitate meetings effectively
Successful delegation guide
Taking meeting minutes guide
Building a solidarity network guide
Federations and networks guide

I didn’t read all of these so I don’t know how useful they all are, but there’s a shortage of good practical documents like these. Maybe they’ll help someone.

ditto clubjacobin; haven’t read them all but this is a useful list of things so i am forwarding them onto my followers

clubjacobin:

tipsforradicals:

The more democratic a group or campaign is, the more effective it is, as all people involved can have an input and feel a part of the project.

Although often basic, this information is essential for the smooth-running of an organisation and sticking to these simple guidelines can make the difference between a long lasting successful group and a failure.

Below find tips on many aspects of organising, from facilitating meetings and financing your group, to structure and making decisions.

I didn’t read all of these so I don’t know how useful they all are, but there’s a shortage of good practical documents like these. Maybe they’ll help someone.

ditto clubjacobin; haven’t read them all but this is a useful list of things so i am forwarding them onto my followers

datzhott:

Plus-Sized Woman Rocks Bikini on Hollywood Boulevard to Promote Body Acceptance
Los Angeles is known for many things: great weather, a laidback lifestyle, and Hollywood’s biggest stars. But for many who live in La La Land, the pressure to conform to a certain beauty standard can leave them feeling downright depressed.

Yesssss fuckin perfect.

datzhott:

Plus-Sized Woman Rocks Bikini on Hollywood Boulevard to Promote Body Acceptance

Los Angeles is known for many things: great weather, a laidback lifestyle, and Hollywood’s biggest stars. But for many who live in La La Land, the pressure to conform to a certain beauty standard can leave them feeling downright depressed.

Yesssss fuckin perfect.

And another gorgeous Lindsey Stirling video; this one with a profound story.

Lindsey Stirling - Transcendence

Female Bodies: A Weighty Issue

fozmeadows:

Hypothesis:

We have, as a society, such a completely disordered, distorted perception of female bodies that the vast majority of people are incapable of recognising what “overweight” actually looks like on a woman, let alone “healthy”. As such, we’re now at a point where women are not only raised to hate their bodies as a matter of course, but are shown, from childhood, a wholly inaccurate picture of what they “should” look like – a narrow, nigh on impossible physical standard they are then punished, both socially and medically, for failing to attain.

I don’t say this lightly. I say it because this is the only conclusion supported by the facts.

Let’s examine the evidence, shall we?

1: BMI

Overwhelmingly, the measurement used to determine whether or not someone is a “healthy weight” is the BMI, or Body Mass Index. Most people are still taught it in schools; indeed, it’s commonly used by doctors and in medical underwriting for insurance purposes,  and is also used by the WHO and various other official bodies, including many universities. It is, however, flawed to the point of uselessness – a fact acknowledged by the man who popularised its usage, Ansel Keys, who explicitly stated that it shouldn’t be used as a tool for individual diagnosis.

There are several main reasons why our cultural reliance on the BMI as a means of assessing health, and particularly women’s health, is deeply problematic:

1. It doesn’t take into account the fact that muscle is denser than fat. As such, it frequently registers athletes and bodybuilders as being obese or overweight, despite their incredible fitness, just because their bodies have greater muscle density, a prejudice which extends to anyone with significant muscle-mass. This is why, for instance, a superfit bodybuilder, Anita Albrecht, was yesterday told by an NHS nurse that she was obese and ordered to go on a strict diet.

2. It doesn’t take height or bodytype into account. Taller individuals will always have a higher BMI regardless of their actual weight, because of the way the measurement is constructed, while shorter people will always have a lower one. Having been originally developed in Europe, using European physical norms, in the 1800s, neither does it factor in ethnicity or metabolism, which is why a Yale University student, Frances Chan, is currently being pushed to develop an eating disorder by the college’s medical administrators, all of whom are so obsessed with her naturally low BMI that they’ve assumed she must be anorexic, and are forcing her to gain unnecessary weight or risk expulsion.

3. Although women are both shorter on average than men while naturally carrying more fat, the BMI calculation doesn’t take this into account, but uses the same measurement for both men and women. In fact, it was originally formulated based on studies of white male populations only - which means that BMI is fundamentally predicated on judging female bodies against male norms. As such, and as useless as the BMI is anyway in terms of individual diagnosis, it’s especially harmful to women and POC, whose morphology and metabolisms it was never meant to accommodate.

4. It doesn’t account for age, or any change in height that occurs with age. A teenager who hasn’t yet achieved their full growth or settled into their normal, adult weight is held to the same standards as someone old enough to have begun losing height

Combine these facts together, and you have a recipe for disaster. All over the world, women of all bodytypes, ages and ethnicities are being told by physicians, family members, universities and insurance companies to try and adhere to a single, “universal” notion of bodily health that is, in fact, predicated entirely on what was considered normal for white European men in the mid-1800s.

2. Clothing Sizes

Consider the women in these two photos, all of whom, despite their wildly differing bodytypes, weigh the Australian average of 70kg, or 154 pounds:

American women who all weigh 154 poundsAustralian women all weighing the average 70kg

Clearly, these women all wear different size clothes for reasons that have absolutely nothing to do with their weight, and everything to do with height and bodytype. But because of the fashion industry’s obsession with tall, thin, white, ectomorphic models – women chosen, not because they’re a representative sample of the population, but so their minimal frames can better serve as coathangers for clothes that privilege a very specific aesthetic over function – we have learned to correlate small sizes with healthy bodies, the better to justify their primacy on the runway, in advertising and on screen as a healthy ideal. Never mind that modelling agencies have been known to recruit at eating disorder clinics, with store mannequins more closely resembling the bodies of anorexic girls than average womenmodels eating tissues to stay thin and rail-thin models photoshopped to hide their ill-health and prominent ribs: because “plus size” models – that is, women whose bodies are actually representative of the general population – are treated as a separate, exceptional category, the fiction persists that “plus size” is a synonym for “overweight”, “unhealthy” or “obese”: women too enormous to wear “normal” clothes, even though the norm in question is anything but. As such, plus-size models are frequently derided as fata jokeunhealthy and bad role models. Today, catwalk models weigh 23% less than the average woman, compared to 8% just twenty years ago – yet whenever this disparity is pointed out, the reaction of many is to just assume that average women must be overweight, and that using plus size mannequins will only encourage obesity. Throw in the fact that women’s clothing sizes aren’t standardised, but fluctuate  wildly from brand to brand – or within the same brand, even - and the idea of judging a woman’s health by what size jeans she wears becomes even more absurd.

For anyone still temped by the idea that the standards set by the fashion industry aren’t really that bad, and that the obesity epidemic is surely skewing statistics somewhat, let me put it bluntly: Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental disorderWomen aged 15-24 are twelve times more likely to die of anorexia than of anything else, while 20% of all anorexics die of their illness. So when I tell you that 20 to 40% of models are estimated to suffer from eating disorders, and that only 5% of American women naturally possess a model’s bodytype, I want you to comprehend my full meaning.

Think about that, the next time you’re tempted to call the girl in the size fourteen jeans overweight.

3. Fat Health

And here, we come to the nub of the problem: the ubiquitous conflation of slenderness with health. With all the statistics I’ve just listed, I shouldn’t have to point out that one can be fantastically thin – model thin, even – and still dangerously unhealthy: among their many other evils, for instance, eating disorders can lead to bone loss and heart complications, to say nothing of the mental health component. What’s much harder to convey, given the overwhelming social incentives to the contrary, is the idea that one can be fat – and I want to talk about that word more, in a moment – and still be physically healthy. Obviously, there are also health risks to being obese, and that’s still something worth discussing, especially given that 6% of deaths are attributable to obesity. But on a daily basis, our fear of this fact, when combined with myriad other social distortions - our obsession with an extremely narrow and largely unrealistic image of female beauty, the conflation of small clothing sizes with healthy bodies, our phobia of anything “plus size”, the false reporting of BMI as an indicator of female wellness – means we’ve lost the ability to tell what obesity actually looks like.

(One cannot help noticing that, while the WHO claims the number of obese persons has doubled since 1980, this statistical leap neatly parallels the adoption of BMI as standard by that same body, which also happened in the 1980′s. Given the appalling flaws of BMI as a system – flaws which not only lead to average-sized women being categorised as overweight or obese for failing to have male proportions, but which also award higher BMI’s to taller people at a time when the average person is getting taller – it’s hard not to wonder, therefore, if it’s not that we’re gaining weight in such massive numbers, but rather that the yardstick for obesity has radically shifted. At the very least, if actual obesity is on the rise, I sincerely doubt it’s rising as much or as quickly as scaremongers seem to think it is, given the undeniable skewing of data inherent to the BMI system.)

Particularly for women, possession of any visible body fat whatsoever is invariably conflated with being overweight or unhealthy, and while that’s true some of the time, what it means in a practical sense is that fat, as a concept, rather than being a simple bodily descriptor, has instead become pejorative, a warning that we need to amend our ways. We talk about fatness like it’s a single, static thing, rather than a relative term: as though, if you’re fatter than someone – anyone – you must also be fat absolutely. We don’t talk about degrees of fatness, or bodytype, or distribution of mass. We LOVE big breasts (provided they’re not saggy, of course, or possessed in the expectation that you’ll be able to buy affordable bras to put them in, which – surprise! – you can’t) and we talk, gingerly, about “curves”, but always in ways that serve to disconnect them from the type of bodies to which, more often than not, such attributes belong: fat ones. Because being fat isn’t the same as being overweight, or obese; it just means not thin, and if you think “overweight” and “not thin” are synonyms, then you haven’t been paying attention. Being called fat, in fact, is often just code for “not the ideal”, which can be down to any number of things – that you have wide hips, stomach rolls, thighs that touch (our obsession with the thigh gap is dangerous in and of itself; unless you have a naturally splayed pelvis, it’s only attainable via malnourishment). Our language is full of mocking, heavily gendered terms tied to particular bits of anatomy or pieces of clothing, all of them designed to police women’s bodies: canklescameltoemuffin topwhale tailtramp stampthunder thighs, junk in the trunksaddlebagschild-bearing hips. As a teenager, I remember seeing a gossip magazine mock Jennifer Aniston for having “arm sausages” – little rolls of skin at the side of her armpits – and feeling physically sick as I realised I had them, too, and must therefore be fat.

Conclusion:

We need to stop reinforcing this idea that if you’re not thin, you’re obese. As a concept, it has absolutely nothing to do with health, and everything to do with justifying our demand for idealised female beauty by mocking anyone who doesn’t meet its impossible standards as overweight. We need to stop relying on BMI to tell us how healthy we are, or not – especially for women – and accept instead that “health” is too complex a concept to be boiled down to a single calculation. Especially given the horrific biases in the healthcare system against anyone seen to be overweight, using a single glib rule to determine the most likely cause of unwellness is not only counterproductive, but dangerous. We need to stop using “fat” as a pejorative, and we sure as hell need to stop the toxic culture of eating disorders, photoshopped images and outright malnutrition currently fuelling the fashion industry.

Because society deserves better. Women deserve better.

We deserve better.

Modern Mythology — giving women a voice

Modern Mythology — giving women a voice

The poem “Eurydice” by H.D. instantly evoked the song “Flowers” from Anais Mitchell’s album Hadestown. I think it is significant that both retellings of the Orpheus and Eurydice myth give the women in the story much greater agency than was given to them originally. In H.D.’s poem, Eurydice rages against the men in her life–both Hades and Orpheus–who dispose of things on her behalf without any…

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bidyke:

universalequalityisinevitable:

Peter Joseph on structural violence, from this video.

Accurate.

This is really important.

"If I put a gun to someone’s head, say, a 30-year-old healthy male, pull the trigger, and kill him, assuming an average life expectancy of 84, you can argue that possibly 54 years of life were stolen from that person in a direct act of violence.

However, if a person is born into poverty in the midst of an abundant society where it is statistically proven that it would hurt no one to facilitate meeting the basic needs of that person and yet they die at the age of 30 due to heart disease, which has been found to statistically relate to those who endure the stress and effects of low socioeconomic status, is that death, the removal of those 54 years once again, an act of violence? And the answer is “Yes, it is.”

You see, our legal system has conditioned us to think that violence is  a direct behavioral act. The truth is that violence is a process, not an act, and it can take many forms. You cannot separate any outcome from the system by which it is oriented.”

thepunkrocker:

thescentofsouls:

I’ll respect your opinion as long as your opinion doesn’t disrespect my existence.

THIS PHRASE SHOULD BE WRITTEN EVERYWHERE AROUND THE WORLD 

torrilla:

Tom Hiddleston sings like a pirate [HD 720P] (x)

In this extra scene from ‘The Pirate Fairy,’ Tom Hiddleston, as a young Captain Hook, sings ‘The Frigate that Flies,’ and discusses the motivations of the nefarious pirate he portrays in the film.

STAAAAAAHP.

Well played, Facebook.
[image: Facebook sidebar “Rate Books You’ve Read” in bold text. underneath it shows a cover of To Kill a Mockingbird and beneath that a cover of Mockingjay.]

I am amused.

Well played, Facebook.

[image: Facebook sidebar “Rate Books You’ve Read” in bold text. underneath it shows a cover of To Kill a Mockingbird and beneath that a cover of Mockingjay.]

I am amused.

charcoalandcowpies:

vampishly:

requirecookie:

therareandferociousswamprabbit:

daveyoufool:

Neither Courage Wolf nor Calming Manatee were doing much to help my anxiety, but I knew they were both on to something.

So, I created Calmage Wolfatee.

<3

This is glorious beyond my capacity to comprehend.

reblogging this again because I need this today.

These are legitly awesome.

The last one especially.

I’m kind of in love with this. Thank you so much daveyoufool.